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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
2021 has been extremely good to me, this is the second excellent M28/30 I have found in the last month, this one local to me in the wild. Only one I've ever found that wasn't online. All original and matching, it would probably be impossible to upgrade on this one! Anyone know which district this rifle was associated with?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Wow, thanks for the info! I’ll definitely be interested in your research services for this one.
 

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That's a very nice, honest example! I'd love to find one locally but I don't think that'll happen anytime soon
 

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Very nice! Congrats!
 

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I was kindly granted permission to post some of my findings here on the forum. This rifle has one of the most comprehensive provenance I have ever seen. The precessor of this M/28-30 was 1904 Tula M/91 (S/N 61419, S 28187). It was returned to Kokemäki Civil Guard Armoury by Guardsman Viinikka on August 30th, 1935. The condition of the bore was listed as III (signs of severe wear, deep pitting or small bulging on the bore). Due to this, the rifle was shipped to SAKO to act as a part donor on September 21st, 1935.

The M/28-30 was fitted with one-piece birch stock. Factory high pressure and accuracy test firing were performed by Kalle Vuoksela. The final inspection took place on November 20th, 1935. Inspectors were Eskola, Mansner and "L". The rifle was shipped from SAKO to Satakunta Civil Guard District on November 21st, 1935. It was again shipped from Satakunta Civil Guard District to Kokemäki Civil Guard on December 9th, 1935. 150 FIM worth of upgrade costs was paid by 28-year-old Guardman Veini Takku, the rest were paid by the Civil Guard / State of Finland.

Veini was part of Takku family who had been living in Kokemäki region at least since year 1458. One distant offspring of the family was Risto Ryti, the fifth President of Finland from 1940 to 1944. Veini Takku was born at Kokemäki on October 14th, 1907. His father and mother were both rather wealthy farmers and landowners. We can follow Takku's economical wealth during the 1920s and 1930s through Finland's public tax records. In 1926, when he was 20 years old, he paid total of 200 äyri (from Swedish öre, the value of äyri in Finnish marks was recalculated every year) worth of municipalital taxes. By 1938 this was grown to 382 äyri, making him one of the most taxed person in Kokemäki area.

Takku had joined Kokemäki Civil Guard as a minor on November 30th, 1923. However, he only took the Civil Guard oath and became full member on April 17th, 1936. This was after he had been issued with the M/28-30 on January 4th, 1936. At the time he was living in a farm located in the village of Riste at the municipality of Kokemäki. While driving home in his car during one night in May 1937, he accidentally struck a drunken farmer called Paavo Hakola. He had made a sudden turn on his bicycle in front of Takku's automobile. According to a newspaper article reproduced below, "the fault was all on Hakola's side".

Unfortunately I couldn't find any shooting competition records for Takku. The rifle was inspected on March 12th, 1939, giving it a rating of I/10 or issued with only minor signs of use and in excellent overall condition. Due to a medical condition in his eye or eyes, apparently he had not been conscripted during the 1920s or 1930s but was instead called to service only after the Winter War on March 27th, 1940. He continued serving for six months and was discharged on September 26th, 1940. During his conscription period he was trained as a pioneer (sapper). At some point, he had been promoted to the rank of Private 1st Class ("korpraali") and had performed reserve non-commissioned officer school.

In the annual report for 1939, Kokemäki Civil Guard mentions most of the Guardmen took their equipment and rifles with them during the mobilisation of the Finnish Defence Forces prior to the Winter War in October 1939. Those who could not participate to the Winter War, had their rifles removed from them and shipped to the Satakunta Civil Guard District. In fact, the m/28-30 was shipped to the District on February 26th, 1940. It is currently unknown where this M/28-30 was shipped but it could be assumed that it wouldn't have been sent to a front line unit as late as February 1940. A more plausible explanation would be that it was instead shipped to one of the infantry training centres at the home front.

The next record shows the rifle had been returned to the Kokemäki Civil Guard on February 1st, 1941. During inspection on March 26th, 1941, the overal condition of the rifle was rated as "8" or good, a drop from the pre-Winter War condition of "10" or excellent. The barrel condition is not mentioned. It wasn't until April 4th, 1941 when Veini Takku was reunited with his privately-funded m/28-30. The final marking on the rifle records tip that he took the rifle with him at some point in 1941, most likely during June 1941 when the Finnish Defence Forces were mobilised prior to the Continuation War. I am currently researching if and where Takku fought during the Continuation War.

There is a brief mention in a Finnish geneological web page that Veini Takku passed away at Kokemäki on August 11th, 1959.









 

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Mangrove's research makes Finnish Civil Guard rifle collecting even better than it already is. Thanks again for offering your services, just awesome to get that kind of history with a military surplus rifle.

My one and only 28/30 is also a 1935 with records, definitely one of my favorites in the collection. Yours looks great, thanks for sharing!
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Martti thanks for posting up the info! I knew this would be a cool one the minute I saw it. I find it so interesting that he received the rifle back after it was sent off the first time. It will be interesting to see what you find out about his Continuation War service!
 

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Congrats on all things. Glad I came back to revisit this thread. I checked Sn against my 1935 but not close enough to say much. Mine is #41495 and didn't record the CG#. Most wonderful home run on this rifle. For me when you find some history of the troop who carried the rifle really adds some already felt but unknown history to what and where this rifle might of gone through. Thank you both bcrampbe and Martti for this thread. IT does make Finn collecting even more interesting. Regards, John.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
At one time I owned one of the very first 28-30s produced and I woefully regret letting it go now that this service is available... it no doubt had a very interesting story to tell as well! This 1935 example certainly makes up for it though.
 

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What a great find, and with the background information, it's one of the coolest 28/30 stories we've seen on this forum over many years.
 
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