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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello, I don’t know much about Mosin rifles. I was hoping someone here wouldn't mind commenting on this one. I purchased it a long time ago when they were $80 on a whim. Is there unusual or uncommon about it or is it a typical example?

thanks,
Mike.
 

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According to Alex's (Ratnik) website, M91/30 production didn't begin until May of 1931, so the OP's rifle is almost certainly an Ex-Dragoon.
And nice one at that.:/
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Here’s a pic of the rear site. Would someone mind explaining what an ex-dragoon is? Is that good or bad? A link would be great too if it’s a long explanation. I googled it briefly but didn’t really find anything explaining it, just a bunch of references to rifles.
 

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Here’s a pic of the rear site. Would someone mind explaining what an ex-dragoon is? Is that good or bad? A link would be great too if it’s a long explanation. I googled it briefly but didn’t really find anything explaining it, just a bunch of references to rifles.
"they" say...buy a gun...buy a book. Lapin was great...but outta print. Short answer...ex-dragoon desirable...by most anyway. AFAIK.
 

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Here’s a pic of the rear site. Would someone mind explaining what an ex-dragoon is? Is that good or bad? A link would be great too if it’s a long explanation. I googled it briefly but didn’t really find anything explaining it, just a bunch of references to rifles.
The original M91 Mosin came in two lengths, the Infantry model with a 31 1/2 inch barrel and the Dragoon and Cossack models with 28 3/4 inch barrels. The Dragoons and Cossacks were meant for mounted infantry and cavalry respectively. Like most nations after WW1 the Russians realized their rifles were too long and sought shorter designs. It took the Soviets until 1930 to finalize the M91/30 design. In the interim they scaled back M91 production and concentrated on Dragoon production. Because the Dragoon and the M91/30 are the same length it was possible to take Dragoons and rebuild them into M91/30's. This work started prior to WW2 but most weren't converted until after the war. These rifles are referred to as Ex-Dragoons by collectors. Any M91/30 dated 1930 or earlier is a Ex-Dragoon and some 1931-32 rifles are as well since production of both models overlapped for those two years
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Ok, makes perfect sense. Thank you for the overview. If the majority of these were converted post war, did they tend to go right to long term storage or did they continue to be used and refurbed over and over? What I’m getting at is if the state it’s in now is the product of a single overhaul right after the war or was it likely done multiple times.

thanks,
Mike
 

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The original M91 Mosin came in two lengths, the Infantry model with a 31 1/2 inch barrel and the Dragoon and Cossack models with 28 3/4 inch barrels. The Dragoons and Cossacks were meant for mounted infantry and cavalry respectively. Like most nations after WW1 the Russians realized their rifles were too long and sought shorter designs. It took the Soviets until 1930 to finalize the M91/30 design. In the interim they scaled back M91 production and concentrated on Dragoon production. Because the Dragoon and the M91/30 are the same length it was possible to take Dragoons and rebuild them into M91/30's. This work started prior to WW2 but most weren't converted until after the war. These rifles are referred to as Ex-Dragoons by collectors. Any M91/30 dated 1930 or earlier is a Ex-Dragoon and some 1931-32 rifles are as well since production of both models overlapped for those two years
Soviets never produced dragoon rifles.
 

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Soviets never produced dragoon rifles.
That's an interesting statement that contradicts long accepted information in all of the major reference books on Mosin rifles as well as the various Mosin websites in English. Do you have a source for this statement? In addition, Mosin rifles with Soviet era dates are fairly common. I personally own 3 Soviet era Dragoons and 4 Soviet refurbished Ex-Dragoon's with dates running from 1920 to 1930. If these rifles are not Dragoons (or Ex-Dragoon's) what model are they?
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Soviets assembled dragoons from existing parts left over, between 1920-30 experiments were conducted to determin length of the barrel and new type of rifling. If it has no imperial markings on the barrel it is not a dragoon. Dragoons as army unit did not exist after 1917. Stocks on dragoons were lighter /thin stock/. My source is Yshenko and Chumak /Ющенко and Чумак / Excellent books, over 300pages each. Rifles in the picture were assembled between 1920-30 and Soviets never called them dragoons. M91 was a standard service rifle during that time.
 
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