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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Since I posted about my 1917 Remington, the one with the German ersatz bayonet adapter, I have acquired an EB9 ersatz bayonet for it.

The bayonet is complete with the scabbard and retains a lot of the original paint and complements the rifle quite nicely I think and it fits the adapter like a glove.....

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Damn! This is like watching a hot ex wife having money and attention lavished on her by her new man. Glad she’s gone to a good home.
JPS must be lost in the bush if he’s not commenting on this thread.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Damn! This is like watching a hot ex wife having money and attention lavished on her by her new man. Glad she’s gone to a good home.
JPS must be lost in the bush if he’s not commenting on this thread.
She'll be very well looked after mate, as will The Finn :thumbsup:
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Looks to have been repainted at one time.
A mate of mine has 1916 German ersatz bayonet of the same type that was a WWI bring-back, along with very nice GEW 98 butcher bayonet, and the paint finish on the ersatz is identical to mine so I believe it is the original finish
 

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I have two with that green paint. Had a butcher with similar green paint. Trench applied? Would they have had paint in the trenches?.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I have two with that green paint. Had a butcher with similar green paint. Trench applied? Would they have had paint in the trenches?.
I'd say the paint was slapped on when they were made, but I would imagine that WWI soldiers had access to paint if the painted camouflage on helmets is anything to go by, especially the German ones.

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I have one of these, no paint at all or evidence there ever was. You can see this one was painted after it had seen some use, (deep scratches painted over). I will concede that it could have been done in the field but not the factory.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
I have one of these, no paint at all or evidence there ever was. You can see this one was painted after it had seen some use, (deep scratches painted over). I will concede that it could have been done in the field but not the factory.
With the number I've seen that are green it could well be likely that they were done in the field to reduce glare from bare metal, which would make sense.
 

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Hello Gents,

It's been a busy couple of weeks with visits from both good Friends as well as relatives, so I've been slow to respond to some of the recent posts that require more detailed information.

Let's start with the bayonet. Yes, the grip and cross-guard of the majority of ersatz bayonets were indeed painted in varying shades of green or black. Remnants of green and black paint exists on a broad cross section of these unusual bayonets, however I'm not aware of any documents that provide proof that ALL of them were painted by the manufacturers? A number of these examples from my Collection can be found in this reference thread on German bayonets.

https://forums.gunboards.com/showthread.php?166857-German-WWI-issue-Bayonets

This is compounded by the fact that the German manufacturers began to apply camo paint to the various versions of the Stalhelm late in the war. With the huge number of helmets that had already been issued, paint was also supplied to units in the field to camo their own Feldgrau Stalhelms. There was an official camo pattern, i.e. large to medium patches of green, rust brown and yellow-ocher with finger width black separating lines that were added in between each colored patch. However, a wide variety of patterns exist that were painted by units in the field. A number of camoed examples from my Collection can be found towards the bottom of this reference thread.

https://forums.gunboards.com/showthread.php?167249-Central-Powers-Helmets

In the case of these camo helmets, the original order issued by the high command still exists. However, this is not the case with the early war ersatz bayonets. We still don't have documentary evidence that they were painted by the manufacturers, though IMHO this was most likely the case.

Moving on to this remarkable German issued Russian M1891 with the Type II bayonet adapter.......

WoW!!! ....... What a fantastic find!!!!! ....... :)>O

Any German captured and altered Russian M91 rifle is a welcome addition to any respectable WWI collection, however the rifles converted to accept the tubular adapters are exceedingly rare with a tiny number having survived over the past 102 years.

Snayperskaya's example is that much more unusual in that very few of the Type II adapters have survived. In well over 30 years of collecting, I have never come across a single Type II adapter outside of a Museum. While it's hard to draw conclusions from the small number of surviving examples, it does appear that there were far more Type I adapters produced than Type IIs.

Please note that the Type I and Type II monikers were applied by our very own Karl-Heinz and are not official nomenclature, but simply a means of differentiating one type from another. Karl-Heinz covers both types in Vol I of his excellent work on the Russian M1891 Three-Line Rifle.


Karl-Heinz Book Vol I R1.jpg


In my own Collection, I have an example of a German issued M91 with the more common Type I adapter.


M91 German Capture w Adapter & Ersatz Socket Blade.jpg

M91 German Capture - Tubular Adapter 01.jpg

M91 German Capture - Tubular Adapter 02.jpg

M91 German Capture - Tubular Adapter 03.jpg

M91 German Capture - Tubular Adapter 04.jpg

M91 German H-Band Bayonet Conversions III R1.jpg

Of additional interest is the photographic evidence of what we'll refer to as the Type III. While I have seen a number of Type Is and Type IIs in Museum collections over the years, I have never seen a surviving example of the Type III? The following photos tend to lose a lot of detail when enlarged, so please bear with me.

Here are a number of photos of the Type I adapter in use by German soldiers.

German Landsturm w M91 w Bayo Adapter.jpg German Lndstrm w Russian ammo pouches & Bayo adapter Detail R7.jpg

German Landsturm w M91 w Tubular Adapter.jpg German Sailor w Mosin w Tubular Adapter.jpg

Krieksmarine w M91s w Type I Tubular Adapters.jpg

Here is a Type I that was produced for issue with captured French Mle 1886/93 Lebels.

German soldier with Mle 1886 Lebel with Bayo adapter.jpg

And in this excellent photo of a unit of the Kriegsmarine, all of the members in the photo have been issued rifles with the Type III adapter.

Kriegksmarine w M91s w Type II Tubular Adapters.jpg

Naval Artillery Unit w M1891s - Detail 2.jpg

Kriegksmarine w M91s w Type II adapters Detail R2 (2).jpg

Kriegksmarine w M91s w Type II adapters Detail R1.jpg

The Type III exhibits a reinforcing band between the muzzle of the rifle and the side mounted bayonet lug that doesn't exist on the Type I and Type II adapters.

Kriegsmarine w M91s w some Type III adapters Marked R3 (2).jpg

It's possible that the Type III is simply a Type I that has had a reinforcing band added? The Type I is without question a weaker design than the Type II.

While I've never come across a period photo of the Type II in use, the surviving examples are obviously proof of their existence and issue.

Great find Snayperskaya! ....... Ya dun gud Bud! ....... I'm almost jealous!

Warmest regards,

JPS
 

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Discussion Starter #16 (Edited)
Thank you so much for your comments JPS and for sharing those excellent photos, very much appreciate your help in indentifying my adapter :thumbsup:

And your rifle with the Type I adapter looks superb, you've got me wanting an example with a Type I as well now!
 
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