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Discussion Starter #1
Hello all I have a chance to aquire this pistol and would like some information. I have done some research and some things don't add up. First all numbers seem to match, mag numbers don't. Barrel has only 3 numbers and measures 6" odd no Navy markings on the gun only Army accepted marks. It is not 9mm it is 30 Luger caliber. Am I missing something any help would be great. Any ideas on value the person who has it is a good friend and would like to be fair with an offer. Plus I don't have a Luger in the collection. Thanks
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It looks like a wartime pistol that was re-barreled postwar to comply with treaty of Versailles regulations


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Discussion Starter #3
Would that explain the 3 numbers on the barrel they are the last 3 of the serial 419, was there restrictions on barrel length as to why this is a 6" where it should be a 4" originally is that correct. Was there a caliber restriction also. Thanks
 

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There would be no Navy marks on gun, Erfurt did not make guns for the Navy. Shooter grade, do not pay more than shooter value especially in .30 luger Just a re-barreled gun. Doubt it was Weimar conversion.
 

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"Military" and "military caliber" handguns were banned in many countries. The 4" P.08 was "military format" and 9x19 P.08 was (and still is!) a "military caliber". This one was exported with that barrel length, which facilitated paperwork and made the process easier. This is a gray area, because while that is almost certainly not the pistol's "very first" and "original" barrel , it's quite possible that barrel has been there for about a century, and likely left Europe with that barrel mounted. The serial number indicates it was headspaced properly and mated to that receiver.

The "made in Germany" identifies it as a postwar (after WWI, that is ) export to the U.S. It's not a "capture" pistol, but has been here for a very long time. The barrel is definitely European, and almost certainly German.

Not as valuable as a pure "original" perhaps, but an interesting historical note.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Shooter value $1000 to $1500 in that shape. Great information guys what a wealth of information. WOW Thanks
 

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With the non-original barrel, finish loss, pitting, worn grips, non-matching mag and import mark it would be a shooter gun - but only if the bore is good and it is mechanically sound. No collector value - just history.
 

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I think $1,500 would be well over the high side. And $1,000 is more than I would pay.

Three strikes:

1. Not original barrel
2. .30 Luger caliber
3. Just rough, rough, pitted, worn, and did I say rough?

If you have $1,500 to spend, you can get one with an original 4" barrel in 9mm.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Well we will be going to shoot it tomorrow, he has over 500 rounds of ammo that he will let go with it. See how it shoots and go from there. I've been collecting old guns for 40 years and I don't think any are 100 percent original. I like to shoot em and like the history of the gun, that's collecting to me. Not every day you find something like this to add to my Shooting collecting. Thanks
 

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Curious as to what your definition of "collector value" is.
Hello panzerfaust44,

I collect WWII era small arms. So, in my interest of collecting, I generally consider at least 90%+ original finish as collector grade. However, with the age of the firearm, my general standards diminish. Of course many other factors affect collectability such as bore condition, mechanical fitness, parts originality, damage, import marks, engraving, plating, accessories, rarity, history, provenance, desirability, etc.

My common old worn out Winchester lever action that a dear freind, now deceased, gave me is priceless to me but it doesn't have any collector value (or probably any value as a shooter either).

How about you?

Regards,
OldInterests
 

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Hello panzerfaust44,

I collect WWII era small arms. So, in my interest of collecting, I generally consider at least 90%+ original finish as collector grade. However, with the age of the firearm, my general standards diminish. Of course many other factors affect collectability such as bore condition, mechanical fitness, parts originality, damage, import marks, engraving, plating, accessories, rarity, history, provenance, desirability, etc.

My common old worn out Winchester lever action that a dear freind, now deceased, gave me is priceless to me but it doesn't have any collector value (or probably any value as a shooter either).

How about you?

Regards,
OldInterests


I agree,

I can be peculiar about firearms as well. I know I don't take any of my WWII P38's to the range.
 

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The first pistol I ever bought, when I was a young person, was a very nice used Mauser HSc. Bought it because it was the gun James Bond used. Took it out to shoot with my older brother who was (and still is) a collector and he said that I shouldn't have that gun out in field. When I asked why not he explained the difference between a collector gun and a shooter gun. I unloaded it and have kept it safe to this day. My road to becoming a collector began that day. Among other things I learned was that James Bond's most iconic carry was not an HSc but rather a PPK and that my HSc was an excellent Kriegsmarine marked model. My brother was kind enough to let me shoot his new CZ-75 that day.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
The first collectible gun I received was in 1975 from my dad before he passed away an P38 that he brought back from WW2, that started the collecting bug for me. Hope this Luger can be a shooter and I can get it a a decent price. Like I said I don't have one, won't mind putting it with the other pieces I have.
 

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I have a 1916 DWM with a .30 Luger (or 7.65 Parabellum as we say in Switzerland) in my collection.


It's a post war modification to "Swiss" standards with .30 Luger barrel and a newly installed grip safety.

I think, the 1916 Erfurt is a pre war modification, as I am sure my 1916 DWM has been modified post war.

war = WW2, in both of my posts g
 

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Personally, I would not pay anywhere near the 1000-1500 you quoted for this. 800 would be my absolute Max.
While I generally agree with your assessment, I would not want to offend a good friend by telling him what it is worth. I would either decline or tell him to make me an offer I can't refuse and I won't.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Well went out and shot the pistol, functioned well no malfunctions fun gun to shoot. He told me he had done a little looking online at pricing. His asking price was way too high, way high so I didn't purchase the gun. Oh well see what comes my way next. Thanks for all of the information from all. Thanks
 
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