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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Picked up a 1911 at a local gun show, cleaned up pretty good but I noticed that the barrel doesn't appear to be centered in the barrel channel. It touches on one side of the aluminum collar as well. Seems to fit securly in the stock with no movement. I have not shot the gun yet, so I don't know how it shoots.


So I guess my question is shouldn't it sit down the center of the barrel channel? Is there a way to correct his? Shims?


Thanks for any input.
 

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Picked up a 1911 at a local gun show, cleaned up pretty good but I noticed that the barrel doesn't appear to be centered in the barrel channel. It touches on one side of the aluminum collar as well. Seems to fit securly in the stock with no movement. I have not shot the gun yet, so I don't know how it shoots.


So I guess my question is shouldn't it sit down the center of the barrel channel? Is there a way to correct his? Shims?


Thanks for any input.
I don't think it will affect accuracy as long as you can jiggle the barrel freely inside the bushing. The barrel is not perfectly centered in either my K11 or M1911, but is free to move a bit. Accuracy with both is as expected.

BTW when I got my M1911 I found that a previous owner had jammed a piece of aluminum beer can - Coor's - between the barrel and the bushing, to prevent free movement. Evidently he did not understand, or believe in, free floating barrels.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for the reply. I did check my other M1911 and found the same thing as well, figured it might have just been my 2 guns (maybe something I did wrong when cleaning). On both of my guns the barrel is free to move, just noticed that it was touching the bushing on the left side of the barrel (looking from the butt) and not on the other. Glad to here this seems to be a normal thing.

I will have to take her out for her birthday (1917, so she is 100) soon and she how she performs.

Curious to see what others find in the collection.
 

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A lot of these long stocks might be dried out after sitting on a close for 50 years since import in the 1960s. dried out stocks can see minor stock warping.

A viable way of restoring the stocks to their original shape is to soak them in raw linseed oil, much like the Enfield rifles were so soaked.

I use the Swiss museum mixture as follows:

10% raw beeswax
30% raw linseed oil
30% white fruit vinegar
30% turpentine

The best way I have found to prepare it is to heat the turpentine to around 68 to 78 Deg C and then dissolve the beeswax, which is shaved into small thing flacks in the turpentine, then add the linseed oil and vinegar. You end up with a white mixture that needs to be shaken prior to application, but not only restores moisture to the wood, but seals it, cleans it and makes it look very good. A dull stock will look great after correct application.

Apply to stock both inside and outside, once all metal is removed. You need to remove the metal, as the vinegar will affect blue. Make sure to get the end grain. Dry wood will soak it up, once the stock has enough that applied mixture will remain on the stock. You can then hand rub a few coats on the make the stock look nice, with a few days between coats. Excess canm be removed witl old rages between coats.

Cheesecloth is needed to polish the stock after final application.

You might find this method helps the stock return to its as built shape, as well as helping stock stability in temp/humidity variation conditions on the range.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for the reply Fritz, great information.

Are the percentages based on weight? Just asking because the beeswax would be a solid and the rest are liquid.

Do you have any pictures of stocks that you have used this treatment on? Would love to see some.
 

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The percentages are approximate, measured by volume. The beeswax has to be dissolved in the mixture, which requires heat to do so and by shaving the beeswax you can reduce the time required to do it.

I do that by a tank of water on the stove with a cooking thermometer to maintain the temp of the water at around 78 Deg C. The mixture I prepare in a discarded alcohol container, which seals quite well. If you allow the temp to rise much above 75 Deg C, the vapor pressure will cause the plastic alcohol container to vent. When dissolving the beeswax a lot of the time is spent agitating the mixture to get the beeswax to dissolve, it take a lot of time.

I have tired a few methods but the best is to start with just turpentine/beeswax, then add the vinegar linseed oil.

Once made the beeswax stays dissolved when cool, but goes from a clear solution to a white goo, not unlike white Elmer glue.
 
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