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Discussion Starter · #21 ·
I hear ya. Carbine similar to yours--but with a correct stock--just sold for under $400 right here on the WTS/WTT. When you consider the cost/hassle of finding a proper stock, that LGS price would need to be pretty cheap to make the project worthwhile.
Yeah, the seller saw my post and asked if I was interested in his Mountain Carbine. He had already sold the Cavalry carbine.

I agree re: the LGS price. To me, given the cost of a correct rifle, even assuming the LGS would deal, it's not worth the money I'd save on a non-matching carbine. I'd rather spend a little more for a matching one.
 

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Discussion Starter · #22 ·
I am THIS close to pulling the trigger but on an 1891 rifle. It's almost pristine and everything matches except the bolt and the price is really "right". I've been hemming and hawing because of the bolt but I think I'm going to get over it since I will use this rifle, as I do almost all, to shoot and have fun. If I was dropping a grand, I might have a different viewpoint. Anyway, regarding the Gew 88 that someone (forgive me - I'm on my phone) asked about, here are some better pics for your thoughts.



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Thanks, that was me asking about the Turked G88. If it's anything like mine (Amberg 1891) it will have a .323 groove. Haven't checked prices in a while, but that seems a little high.

Wouldn't worry about the 1891 mismatched bolt if you're looking for a shooter and the price is attractive.
 

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Discussion Starter · #24 ·
I ended up buying the 1891. I think I got a heck of a deal. For $350 shipped, I got the rifle, a new set of RCBS dies, 50 once-fired Norma cases and 200 Hornady 174 grain round nose. He is a very nice older gentlemen and I got the sense that he just wanted to pass it on to someone who would appreciate it.


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Be careful when reloading for the Model 1888, 1891 Commission rifles. The "S" on your receiver indicates that it was throated for the .323" slug. The bore diameter could still be .320-.321" . I shoot .322" cast bullets in mine. Your rifle will take standard 8x57 Mauser cartridges as far as chambering is concerned. But the bore is not correct unless somewhere along the way it has had the rifling deepened to .323" groove diameter. Slug the bore to get a measure. It will last longer and stay sharper with cast slugs anyway.
Also, the 1909 Engineers carbine talked about way at the beginning of this thread has been reblued along the way. Surprisingly, the price for the Engineer's carbine is pretty fair as is. You might get it a bit cheaper as the numbers are not matched, but don't bet on it. Check the condition of the bore as many of these look nice on the outside but are shot out. The stocks are not full length Mannlicher style stocks, but these are definately short rifles and are and have always been quite rare. Also called Mountain Carbines. See Mr. Webster's book. The Model 1891 Argentine Engineers carbine is a modification of the standard Model 1891 Cavalry Carbine. The Engineer's carbine was a modification of an 1891 Cavalry Carbine made by adding bayonet lugs to the barrel and a cut-down version of the Remington 1879 Remington Rolling block bayonet was fit. I have two of these carbines in excellent shape and just had to have a bayonet to fit. If you want sticker shock, pay $400 for one of those....
All for now,
Thors
 

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Discussion Starter · #27 ·
Be careful when reloading for the Model 1888, 1891 Commission rifles. The "S" on your receiver indicates that it was throated for the .323" slug. The bore diameter could still be .320-.321" . I shoot .322" cast bullets in mine. Your rifle will take standard 8x57 Mauser cartridges as far as chambering is concerned. But the bore is not correct unless somewhere along the way it has had the rifling deepened to .323" groove diameter. Slug the bore to get a measure. It will last longer and stay sharper with cast slugs anyway.
Also, the 1909 Engineers carbine talked about way at the beginning of this thread has been reblued along the way. Surprisingly, the price for the Engineer's carbine is pretty fair as is. You might get it a bit cheaper as the numbers are not matched, but don't bet on it. Check the condition of the bore as many of these look nice on the outside but are shot out. The stocks are not full length Mannlicher style stocks, but these are definately short rifles and are and have always been quite rare. Also called Mountain Carbines. See Mr. Webster's book. The Model 1891 Argentine Engineers carbine is a modification of the standard Model 1891 Cavalry Carbine. The Engineer's carbine was a modification of an 1891 Cavalry Carbine made by adding bayonet lugs to the barrel and a cut-down version of the Remington 1879 Remington Rolling block bayonet was fit. I have two of these carbines in excellent shape and just had to have a bayonet to fit. If you want sticker shock, pay $400 for one of those....
All for now,
Thors
I think you're talking about the Gew88 pictured above? I didn't buy it. I was posting the pics in response to a prior post. I ended up buying a 1899 Argentine Model 1891 rifle.


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Discussion Starter · #28 ·
So, my quest for an Argentine Mauser is partially realized. I got a Model 1891 (1899 manufacture) on Friday. The bolt doesn't match (same series, but off by about 2,000) and has some light rust on the underside, which I think I should be able to remove with some penetrating oil and fine steel wool. Everything else matches, including the cleaning rod and the bluing is very good overall. I'm pretty pleased.

http://s262.photobucket.com/user/abulgin/library/Argy 1891
 

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Discussion Starter · #29 ·
So, my quest for an Argentine Mauser is partially realized. I got a Model 1891 (1899 manufacture) on Friday. The bolt doesn't match (same series, but off by about 2,000) and has some light rust on the underside, which I think I should be able to remove with some penetrating oil and fine steel wool. Everything else matches, including the cleaning rod and the bluing is very good overall. I'm pretty pleased.

http://s262.photobucket.com/user/abulgin/library/Argy 1891

I uploaded some better photos.

http://s262.photobucket.com/user/abulgin/library/Argy 1891. I like it a lot.
 
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