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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just received four 1891 Argentine Loewe receivers that seem to be the elusive original spare parts receivers that I read about when I was investigating the old-style versus new-style crests and worrying about whether I had bought a faked 1891 rifle with crest.

These were the first I saw, but a couple other sources are now also offering them. Apparently some must have been cut loose from someone's collection.

These are not perfect. They have some nicks and scratches that must have come from bouncing around over the years. However, they are clearly never-been-used parts, and must have been part of the 10% spare parts orders.

Old archive threads warned about nice looking crested rifles being made up from these. I am happy to know that these have the old-style crest and my rifle has the new-style crest. So my rifle was not built from one of these.

As you might expect, these have been tested at the factory and bear the clasping hands inspection mark and the MB script test firing proof mark. There is also a line on the receiver ring, that I think might have been used to install a barrel for test firing. The receiver has been slow rust blued after the marks were applied, as would be expected.


Well. Without further adieu. The pictures . . .
 

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Arg. Mauser receivers

This may be directed to JoeATCM,And the rest who can answer. I wanted to ask that my 1891 Arg. Mauser has had the crest ground off of the top and wanted to ask why was this done to such a beautiful rifle? And the rifle was sitting in the attic for about 90 years and this one was not used and abused like some of the mil. surplus rifles I have come across but with the crest ground off is the rifle worth anything at all? All numbers match even the cleaning rod and are the rifles known to be accurate? Because this one sure is. It has a wax coating on it and wanted to know is it safe to remove or is this the reason it looks the way it does? And are any of those receivers for sale?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
An all matching in nice condition with scrubbed crest has been selling for $400 to $600 lately on Gun Broker.

The crests were ground off before exporting them. There are several theories why, ranging from caught suppling rifles to other countries to just some beaurocrat whim.

You could clean the wax off the metal using some safe solvent like Kroil or Ballistol. Nothing with acid in it and only soft patches or nylon brush for starters. But you need to keep some sort of oil or grease on it to prevent rusting.

If you plan to shoot it, be sure to remove any wax in the bore. You should probably have some qualified person check it before shooting.

Hope this helps. I am typing with one finger on my tablet, so I am typed out for now.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I don't plan to sell mine, but you could look on Gun Broker.

Oh, and the 1891 rifles were very well made and can be accurate with the right ammo. There are archive threads with more info.
 

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......The crests were ground off before exporting them. There are several theories why, ranging from caught supplying rifles to other countries to just some beaurocrat whim.....
The only data regarding this matter has came from a well-known Argentinian guns & outdoor magazine: Magnum.
The few, brief that mentioned such procedure always refer to a law implemented at the time of the surplus sale that made mandatory the crest obliteration for selling such stamped military equipment abroad under "patriotic" reasons.

The only time I've read about defacing markings on guns for apparent covert sales to another country came in a "Magnum" article about the Sistema 1927 pistols (Colt 1911A-1s made in Argentina under license), where an old Domingo Matheu factory employee stated to the writer that he saw how a small group of technicians were "discretely" using a belt sander to erase factory markings of the synthetic grips of the otherwise still unmarked pistols. Later he got the word from one of the involved that the guns were being covertly shipped by train to Bolivia.

It's said that during the Chaco war, Argentina could have supplied one or even both of the combatants with rifles ('91s or '09s...not specified) and other military equipment such as ammo, but never have read about finding actual evidence of such behavior. Back then Bolivia was a somewhat troublesome ally against neighboring Chile with whom they both had big active territorial claims to resolve (And actually the only other country other than them and us issuing 7.65 Mauser rifles; Bolivia had recently equipped their troops with new VZ-24s), but also had close cultural & commercial relations with Paraguay (That in the other hand used 7mm. Mauser rifles along with a lot of captured Bolivian equipment), so if this is true, it was a masterful geopolitical operation since they could get in big trouble if caught supporting one of the parties engaged in the live conflict.
 

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The crests were ground because the congress in Buenos Aires was not pleased with the price Sam Cummings paid for the lot. This is documented in the Argentine congress minutes.
Jim,

You do not by chance have a quote of this? I looked at one point, I believe I read a comment by you or another member, and my Spanish abilities are ZERO and did not get very far. Google Translate was of marginal use.

Vlad,

A friend just picked up a Argentine Mannlicher that is just beautiful. Except for the crest being ground off the side.
 

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The huge shipment from Argentina that Century Arms brought in in the early 90s had some receivers in it. I picked up 2 1909 receivers that had no marks at all. The rifles and carbines had their crests intact.
SteveK
 
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