Gunboards Forums banner
1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Banned
Joined
·
80 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Do you guys know the going rate for one of these? There's a guy at my local range who is looking to sell one for $800.
I know the french 1873 chamelot delvignes are going from around 600-800 these days, but I can't seem to find much data on the Italian version. I've only found a couple auction listings over the past 10 years, and condition seems to vary drastically.

Also, from what I've read they were kept in service and not officially retired until after WWII. Does that mean they will be safe to shoot the smokeless 10.4mm Italian/10.35mm Bodeo rounds?
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
80 Posts
Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Also does anyone know what the differences between the regular 1874 model and the 1881 officer's model are?

According to this website: glisenti

A nice couple; the white is in original configuration (white, firing pin one piece with the hammer, drum axe not removable), the black was blued about 1881 for Cavalry & Officers use (blued, firing pin fixed to hammer, removable drum axe).​
There is the obvious difference in finish (blued vs white) and in the hammer (firing pin integral to hammer vs firing pin pinned to hammer).

But does anyone know what "drum axe" is supposed to mean, in the context of removable vs non-removable?
If it follows the French 1873 chamelot delvigne system, I'm pretty sure the cylinder should be removeable for normal servicing...

3784263
 

·
Moderator / Silver Bullet member
Joined
·
8,081 Posts
from the French language portion of the website
'axe du barillet' = cylinder pin
'démontable' = removable

Yes a smokeless load was developed for these during their years in service and is safe to shoot, the original black powder charge consisted of 1.10 g (17 grs.) of fine-grained black powder and eventually a smokeless load of 0.55 g of ballistite was used.
 
  • Like
Reactions: sleepysquirrel2

·
Banned
Joined
·
80 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Hmmm so does that mean the cylinder isn't removable!? I gotta ask him about that because that would flip upside down my understanding of how the chamelot delvigne system works

And yes that's nice knowing that smokeless was used in them (I've heard mixed accounts of the 1874's being used in WWI and even WWII). Do you know if the 1889 Bodeos are better suited to handle smokeless than the 1874 Glisenti's?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
235 Posts
In my opinion this is not correct information there, about not removable drum axe. Axes in both pieces are the same, have fixation button with its flat spring. Could be remove out. And you can remove the cylinder too. Other information is OK, were used in polished and dark finishes. In service very long time, and later used same cartridges as m1889 revolver. There were three version of official cartridge in the army: M.1874, M.90, M.90-99.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
80 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
There were three version of official cartridge in the army: M.1874, M.90, M.90-99.
Thank you Wdog, you're right, it looks like from the other thread there were several variations, going from:
1) pure lead bullet on black powder
2) copper jacketed bullet on black powder
3) copper jacketed bullet on smokeless (ballistite) podwer


3784974
3784976


I'm assuming shooting cast lead will be the most "authentic" way with the Italian chamelot delvigne, which is sort of par for the course with the french Chamelot Delvignes.
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top