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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Guys I just acquired a 1863 savage contract rifle. A guy I know, his dad received it as a gift in 1935 and was used by him up until he was sent to duty in europe during ww2. The rifle has been sitting in the same closet since 1958, has not been fired since. Pretty good condition for its age and usage. The rifle has been cut down. Whether it's post war, cadet rifle, training rifle, ect. Or even during war repair, which I have read some have been repaired during the war. The rifle is NJ marked, VP on the barrel, clean lock plate, and an operation ID engraving from when the gun was in operation at the time. My question is, is there any real significant value to a low production savage contract rifle (25k made). I mainly bought it for the historical value and the story behind it, like most collectors do.
 

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99% certain that it is a post service conversion for military school usage, many of these stayed in use by military schools until the early 20th Century. At the end of the American Civil War there were hundreds of thousands of surplus military arms sitting in armories, state and Federal, and they were not needed. They went to large surplus purchasers - Bannerman's of New York and Stokes-Kirk of Philadelphia among others - and, depending on condition, were broken up for parts and scrap, converted like this one or were sold as is for sale to the public or small buyers like individual gunsmiths who "sporterized" them for low end shotguns. Is yours still rifled or has it been smoothbored?

Due to configuration I am 99% certain that it is a post service conversion for military school usage, many of these stayed in use by military schools until the early 20th Century.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
No rifling. Would this type of conversions m be considered a rare uncommon rifle being only 25k produced, but not fully original
99% certain that it is a post service conversion for military school usage, many of these stayed in use by military schools until the early 20th Century. At the end of the American Civil War there were hundreds of thousands of surplus military arms sitting in armories, state and Federal, and they were not needed. They went to large surplus purchasers - Bannerman's of New York and Stokes-Kirk of Philadelphia among others - and, depending on condition, were broken up for parts and scrap, converted like this one or were sold as is for sale to the public or small buyers like individual gunsmiths who "sporterized" them for low end shotguns. Is yours still rifled or has it been smoothbored?

Due to configuration I am 99% certain that it is a post service conversion for military school usage, many of these stayed in use by military schools until the early 20th Century.
 
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