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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My 1640K (alloy floor plate) has a binding bolt. Not badly, only when you are drawing it back - the guide rib binds on the left hand face against the corrospnding groove in the bridge. If you make sure you pull the bolt straight it's fine. But if you don't think about it or are working it fast it is annoying.

In general the action is in good nick, and it is clean with a light layer of gun oil. Is there anything that can be done to ease this binding? Is it a known problem on 1640s? My Brno 98 doesn't bind at all.
 

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Binding bolts are definitely not a general problem with 1640 rifles. I have never encountered one and have handled a lot of them. Without having the rifle in hand I don't know what may be the problem. It might be worthwhile to have a gunsmith take a look at it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I seem to be unlucky with this one. I get the only one most have heard of un D&T'd, and it's also the only one with a binding bolt...

I could take it to a gunsmith, if I had the time and money - both kind of short round here at the moment. Also, I know what they'd say round here - "it's an old warn out rifle, let you need a new remington/tikka t3". Logically, I can't see any way of improving it, or the cause. Apart from ware to the bridge groove or guide rib (I'm guessing the former). I was just wondering if anyone else had experienced it. Maybe not though.
 

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I've never experienced this problem with Husqvarnas, but there are a lot of 1640 shooters here on the forum and perhaps someone with some experience with such a thing will chime in. Well, unless you really try hard, it is very difficult to wear out a Husqvarna. And, not to be heretical, but Remingtons and Tikkas are okay, but they aren't Husqvarnas and therein lies the rub - :)

I would hope Z1r, who is a gun maker for a living, would comment on this. Some may suggest using polishing or lapping compound and "smoothing" things up, but I would rather know what is causing the bind before attempting a fix.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
yeah, I agree on all fronts. Funny thing is it doesn't seem that worn out in general, so I'm suprised. So yep a gunmaker's comments like z1r would great!
 

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kriggevær is right, don't start polishing until you know what is causing the binding and where it is binding.

There are many things that will cause a bolt to bind. In a Mauser a primary contributor is the extractor. Look for rub marks on it. The extractor collar can also contribute to or cause binding. The 1600 actions are typically hard enough that even if maching marks are present they are still pretty smooth.

Magic marker or Dykem on the bolt will show you were it is binding, then you need to find out why. If polishing is in order a small hard stone is best. Avoid lapping compound.

good luck.

I've seen one or two worn out 1600's but any gun that is worn out is rare, most folks just don't shoot em enough. Had one come through that had the rear bolt bearing surface enlarged. It was most likely made on the large side to begin with and lots of use wore it larger. The owner wanted the shot out barrel replaced but the tunnel had worn so much that the front of the bolt would ride over the cartridge rims in the magazine. that one was worn out.
 

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First check- does it bind if the barreled action is removed from the stock?

This is more likely with a Mauser action with a thumb cut for clip loading but I have seen the stock bedding so screwed up that the rear of the receiver is bent down when the action screws are tightened and this caused the bolt to bind. Worth a check before you work on the metal.
 

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lcmunn has an excellent idea! Just two weeks ago I was helping a friend with his HVA 640, 8x57 with commercial m/38 "reinforced" action with a bolt that would barely cycle. After some investigation, I found the action screws were so tight that the magazine box was pressing against the bottom of the receiver. And, as lcmunn said, we took the action out of the stock without the floorplate and lo and behold it would cycle as it should. Reinstalled everything with some Loctite, to keep action screws from backing out, and magazine box no longer touching the receiver and functions smooth as butter.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks a lot guys. I've just had another look at it - I think I was wrong thinking it was the guide rib. I'll pull it out of the stock later and also try the marker trick
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I may not have made it clear in the first post - it only binds when pulling from the handle and angling it left. If you make sure you pull it straight back it's fine. I'm now worried this means it's worn and there is no fix. Is this reasonable?
 

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Unless there is solid material evidence of wear on other parts or documentation of intensive use, I doubt if it is worn. As long as the ammunition is kept at reasonable pressure levels or the firearm operates in a hostile environment, most modern firearms are capable of thousands, if not tens of thousands, of fired rounds. The average hunter usually doesn't fire enough ammunition in a lifetime to wear out a barrel, let alone an action.
 

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In addition to the places to look mentioned above, take a look at the ejector/ejector spring. Sometimes a couple of treatments with Flitz in enough to smooth an action. I have seen a number of sticky actions on near new guns that have not been used much, but I have not seen an action worn to the point of being sticky.
 

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never had this problem...not near my guns...to look at the mechanics
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
The thing is it does seem to be caused by too much play- there is quite a lot of side to side slop and when you angle the rear of the bolt towards the the left so the extractor notes towards the right that is when it binds. At all stages when the bolt is coming back. But when i carefully pull it straight back it is fine. That's what concerns me- it seems like it is binding because it's too loose. Maybe it hasn't worn out but always was this bad?
 

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?????check

look at the bolt release in side part of the action that contacts, the bolt stop......?
had a problem with binding in another modle rifle!
 

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I had a similar problem after a Redfield peep was installed on my 648. The mounting screws were a tad too long. Removed them, shortened and beveled them with a dremel and it took care of the problem. The magic marker test helps reveal pinch points/strong contact areas. I'm mentioning this since you said it was drilled and tapped. The screws that come with bases are sometimes too long and add intereference. So I would suggest checking the scope base screws or even the filler screws. Hope this helps
 

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Had the same ugly problem with my 1640, in 7x57, which had not been used for many years, ands was still in mint conditon when I bought it. Lots of tender loving care, Micro Bedding, elbow grease and various oils and manipulation of the action, suddenly made it work properly again. Great, accurate and fast gun for hunting.
 

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usherj....had one of those deals too!
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
OK I've done some investigating, and haven't got very far... I pulled it out of the stock - no difference and no rub marks on the bottom metal. I removed the extractor and collar, also no difference.

I can see the bottoms of the base screws, but there is clearance between the top of the guide rib and the bridge groove. And there are no rub marks at all on the rib.

I tried the pen trick, and it confirmed rub marks - mostly on the bottom of the bridge. Binding gets worse the more downwad and left hand pressure you exert. I did try hand stoning (hard arkansas) the area on the bolt, but no help. There was a very minor improvement when I applied some EP90 sparingly. Should I hit the bolt with a polishing wheel and the bottom bridge surface with a dremel and polisher?





Had the same ugly problem with my 1640, in 7x57, which had not been used for many years, ands was still in mint conditon when I bought it. Lots of tender loving care, Micro Bedding, elbow grease and various oils and manipulation of the action, suddenly made it work properly again. Great, accurate and fast gun for hunting.
COuld you expand a bit on this - what was your tender loving care and elbow grease? The bedding seems pretty good and it doesn't make a difference whether it's in or out of the stock so I'm guessing there is no need. Accuracy is also good.
 

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slightly polish... then molybdenum sulfate the action / bottom of bolt contacts in your photo....
its a hunting gun and in the field we concentrate on the shot this little aggravation wont be noticed or concentrated on like at the bench or in the gun room...
i had a very accurate beautiful whitworth American field love it but the more i fooled with the bolt the sticker it felt in the at the range / bench.....
traded it in Roanoke VA for a Husky with org. factory most "figured wood" i have seen....

sometimes we focus on the one fly in the ointment but not the whole usable jar thats left!
 
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