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1903 barrel looks correct and is a RA not RI one. All look fine for the $ involved. Rifles were sanded in service so to me no biggie.
good haul
 

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Adding BLO will just mess them up more. No need to do anything, as they are already sanded beyond help.

That said, you didn't get hurt as you can probably get $400 each on average, if you decided to sell. But collector interest is severely diminished.
 

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All of them as you know appear to have been sanded at least. The nicest and most original appears to be the Savage No4 Mkl*. The 03 isn’t particularly valuable given the apparent condition of the bore the heavily sanded scant stock and the drill and tap for the receiver sight. As an aside has the receiver been drilled twice as there appears to be another spot above the current holes that was either annealed to drill holes or is where prior holes were welded up. Still worth what you have in them.
 

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ANOTHER post reduced to uselessness due to a 'shy' original poster.

I hate it when this happens.
 

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In case the OP is reading this. The US military never used BLO on any stocks. Always used RLO. BLO will seal the stock so it cannot get enough oil into the wood until the BLO is removed. The same thing applies to those who insist on Tung oil being used. It seals the wood preventing oil being absorbed that is needed by the stock.
 

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What the US armories actually did was purchase raw linseed in 55 gallon drums. They boiled it on site and dipped the stocks into the hot oil and hung them to dry. This information was posted direct from govt documents. I think it is also in one of my bibles. I am pretty confident we can use the term boiled, even if it was invoiced as raw.
 

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Well I will not speak of any stocks except for the .30 carbine. The Raw oil was heated and warmed but not boiled. The stocks were then dipped into the warmed oil and the oil allowed to seep into the wood. If it was boiled it would have sealed the wood not allowing enough oil into the stock. Boiled oil also adds a shine to the wood that can reflect light which a solder in the field does not want.
 
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