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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've been searching and searching for a nice example of one of these. I wouldn't have gotten it had I not decided last minute to pull into the pawn shop I was about to pass. :thumbsup: $200 OTD

Crown is great and bore is a freaking mirror!


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Amazing how the stock looks, Nice.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks guys. They were asking $250 and told me that was negotiable so I asked bottom dollar and they said $200 taxes included.

You can bet your last $$ that the stock is American Black Walnut (Juglans *****). Somewhere I have photos filed away of merships off-loading ABW logs in Bremer-Haven early in the 1900's.
Could you tell me more about it and this about the stock? I don't know jack about K98a Mausers but would love to learn!
 
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Can't comment on the rifle since this is not my special area, but Milsurp20 probably can. He's one of the Gurus here.

I'm betting on American Black Walnut based on cellular structure of the wood easily visible, and the overall appearance of the wood. Also the knowledge that the German Arms industry, military and civilian, favored ABW right up 'till WWII terminated deliveries in the mid-1930's.

Take a look at IMG 2308 and draw an imaginary line north-south and east-west through the center of the photo: See the small round spots that really show up in the northeast quadrant of the photo? These are the ends of "storied ray cells" that move food material (sugars made in the green leaves) from the inner-bark (zylem-phloem cells) to the center of the tree for storage 'till needed for growth. This is a very pronounced characteristic of ABW as is the dark, almost black streaks of food material that is seen moving along the grain left-right, right-left. Many ring-porous hardwoods of the eastern USA forests will show this characteristic. The "Tiger Stripe" of soft and hard Maples is a good example. You see this "Tiger Stripe" in stocks of high-end American arms all the way back to the flintlock period. The dark stripes are the same thing....sugars made in the leaves and moved down the tree then to the center for storage. Refer to the "Wood handbook" published by the US Forest Service Forest Products Lab in Madison, Wisc. to learn more about this identifying characteristic.
 

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Feel free to box that up with the other toy. :D
 

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Can't comment on the rifle since this is not my special area, but Milsurp20 probably can. He's one of the Gurus here.

I'm betting on American Black Walnut based on cellular structure of the wood easily visible, and the overall appearance of the wood. Also the knowledge that the German Arms industry, military and civilian, favored ABW right up 'till WWII terminated deliveries in the mid-1930's.

Take a look at IMG 2308 and draw an imaginary line north-south and east-west through the center of the photo: See the small round spots that really show up in the northeast quadrant of the photo? These are the ends of "storied ray cells" that move food material (sugars made in the green leaves) from the inner-bark (zylem-phloem cells) to the center of the tree for storage 'till needed for growth. This is a very pronounced characteristic of ABW as is the dark, almost black streaks of food material that is seen moving along the grain left-right, right-left. Many ring-porous hardwoods of the eastern USA forests will show this characteristic. The "Tiger Stripe" of soft and hard Maples is a good example. You see this "Tiger Stripe" in stocks of high-end American arms all the way back to the flintlock period. The dark stripes are the same thing....sugars made in the leaves and moved down the tree then to the center for storage. Refer to the "Wood handbook" published by the US Forest Service Forest Products Lab in Madison, Wisc. to learn more about this identifying characteristic.
While I'm flattered, I am far from a guru lol. Just a guy trying to keep up and a penchant for interjecting his opinion. RyanE nailed this rifle down in guru fashion. Woodsrunner, do you feel that the shipments of ABW were intended for commercial firearms then redirected to military production or strictly military to begin with?
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I need to start shopping at pawn shops lol. A fine Volksstrum rifle, great pickup!


HDH.
As in the last ditch effort by Hitler to bring old men and young boys into the war in the last months of WWII? How do you know? All I can tell from the rifle is it was used during WWII due to the blued bolt and the Waffenamt. lol
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
While the older K98a were relegated to second tier units for the most part, I doubt this one was reworked for the volkssturm. And it's not a Waffenamt; it is a Heereszeugamt (HZa) acceptance stamp.
My mistake. So what is the difference? And what do you guys think this rifle was issued to? No unit marks, no signs of police use, no 1920 stamp...it is weird vs the other K98as I've seen.

Also the stock stays original and was never "upgraded" to the later version.
 

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My mistake. So what is the difference? And what do you guys think this rifle was issued to? No unit marks, no signs of police use, no 1920 stamp...it is weird vs the other K98as I've seen.

Also the stock stays original and was never "upgraded" to the later version.
The Heereswaffenamt (Army Ordnance Department) was responsible for a lot of things including the inspection and acceptance of new production. The waffenamtstempel acceptance is only applied to newly manufactured parts and weapons.

The Heereszeugamter (Army equipment depots) were the depots where new equipment was delivered before distribution to the units in the field. The HZa and HNZa were responsible for repairing damaged rifles, reworking older rifles, and captured foreign rifles. Yours is out of HZa Hannover (Hr).

Its an army rework, so pretty much any unit that was supplied by the army could have ended up with it. The lack of the 1920 isn't that odd. A lot of rifles were hidden away in Germany during the 1920s and 1930s.Not sure I understand you statement about the stock.
 

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Man once again we have a forum member I will not be speaking to for a while.
Yes I am envious{;>
Great find you lucky dawg!!!!
 
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