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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
ГКДТХ (GKDTX):
Does this mean anything that pertains to the Great Soviet Patriotic War. I'm guessing that it is an acronym; maybe for a slogan that was popular at the time. I am hoping that one of our history experts has maybe seen it before and can solve the puzzle. Thanks for pondering this very unusual engraving on a 1943 Ishevsk.
 

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No, Great Patriotic War is Великая Отечественная Война, abbreviated ВОВ. The carving probably has a less glamorous provenance and is probably the work of a bored sentry long after WWII.
 

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No, Great Patriotic War is Великая Отечественная Война, abbreviated ВОВ. The carving probably has a less glamorous provenance and is probably the work of a bored sentry long after WWII.
Probably, but he didn't ask if it meant Great Patriotic War, only if it might be a slogan which pertained to it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I find it hard to believe that a Red Army soldier would deface his/her rifle with some kind of "joanie loves chachi" or similar type of nonsense. Would you have carved anything on the rifle that was issued to you? I think not; at least not without feeling the wrath of your command.
A slogan however, would be different. "Za Stalin" (literally "For Stalin" but understood to mean "I will die for Stalin") was oftentimes painted on the side of a tank turret. This stock engraving is five consonents; obviously some kind of abbreviation for something (they had abbreviations for everything).
Maybe it means "Go Kill da Teutonic Xenophobes" (ha ha. just kidding. [ok, not funny]).:(
 

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Hmm... I can't think of a thing. Maybe together they form some kind of word or phrase or something that was important to the person doing the carving. Or it could've been an illiterate Russian soldier practicing his alphabet lol
 

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Coastie,does your Izhevsk have any unusual markings or proofs on receiver-like Triangle 12 or 21? is it a earlier import or with the smaller billboard.The reason I ask is there seem to be 91/30s that came in or are comming in with "Albianian" features- The renumbered parts dont have the Cyrillic prefix's, the had guard had a small hump in it past the lower band,and finally the buttstock contours are different than a regular Soviet buttstock.Lower buttstock sling slot is in different position.The comb of buttstock will have flat part in front of buttplate and is a taller hump before tapering into wrist.Some of the eariler imports-pre billboard will have mis-matched bolts,and sometimes they are Chinese t-53 bolts.The stock grafitti has me leaning that way.Its all not for certain but I have 2 differernt 91/30s with these non standard features that make me think these may have been in Albania-Just a thought.I posted pics of a 91/30 I received recently that has a very distorted buttstock,and is a 1943 Izhevsk.Stamped # but no prefixs.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Betonfahrer;
Interesting and thanks for the info. I am waiting for it to be mailed to me. It does have the billboard stamp. It's a `43 Ishevsk with a two letter prefix and imported by CAI.
This brings up a good question: How does CAI (and other importers) work overseas? Do they have agents who go to several countries and acquire MNs? Perhaps a bigger Country (i.e. Russia) purchases MNs from other Countries which creates a secondary market that targets CAI and other importers. How would an Albanian MN make it from Albania to CAI?
Can a person access importer records to find out specifically when their MN came into the U.S. based on the new serial number that has been stamped on the receiver?
 

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Hell no Century wont tell you or me anything.To them its all about the sale.Move the guns get paid and open up another conex box.As I had stated in the latst batch of 91/30s my dealer got in had the one wierd one that may have "Albanian "orgins.I have always been looking for non refurb 91/30s.I have another Izhevsk 43 that is worn,has the distorted stock and some different proof marks.They may have come in with the Albanian SKS rifles and just sat in a corner as plain 91/30s-it makes no sense-there seem to be some 45 and later dated 91/30s that came in with the last batch of imports.Vit also made a great point-it does seem Soviet weapons didnt carved on.The Non JNA and territorial units may have done most of the carving on the Yugoslav imports.Which leads me to think maybe your 91/30 was used by someone Non Soviet army.Post more pictures when you get it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Just got this bad boy in yesterday. It is not ГКДТХ on the stock. The first symbol is actually the number '1' with a much smaller cyrillic "ee" (looks like a backwards N to us) or "ee kratkoyeh" (backwards N with an inverted arc above it) just to the right of the '1' and much smaller than the other characters and it is underlined.
If I had to guess, I would say that it is cyrillic for '1st' (but I don't know russian). If my hunch is correct than it is "1st КДТK" (turns out it is not an X at the end but another K).
The rifle is a 1943 Izhevsk with a polished receiver and completed milling/polishing on the bridge. There are no refurb stamps on the rifle. Why would Izhevsk decide to polish this particular 91/30? It is not a sniper/ex sniper (no holes or sniper stamps).
I bought it off of Gunjoker; $114 after shipping.
 

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f my hunch is correct than it is "1st КДТK" (turns out it is not an X at the end but another K).
Just speculation:
КД = Red Banner Far Eastern Military District
ТK = tank corps

This is from a 40 year old glossary of Soviet military abbreviations.
At this point I cannot verify if there was any sort of tank corps organization in eastern Siberia. Additionally, typical communist Russian paranoia would not allow a unit designation on a rifle, unless for deliberate deception.
 
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